OUD Project Contact Information

Rebecca Sky, MPH

Project Director

rsky@healthynh.com

603.415.4277

Opioid Use Disorder Access to Treatment Project

This project is intended to support New Hampshire hospitals rising to the challenge of expanding access to treatment for people with Opioid Use Disorders(OUD).  This project is funded by a grant from the NH Department of Health and Human Services Bureau of Drug and Alcohol Services through June 2018.  It is part of a statewide effort to reduce substance misuse increasing the opportunity for residents of New Hampshire to achieve health and contribute their full potential to our communities. 

Through this work, hospitals in New Hampshire are implementing two types of projects:

Bridge to Treatment – To grow emergency department resources and protocols for addressing harm reduction and connecting OUD patients with community treatment, supports, and services.

MAT Development - Increasing the availability of Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) in hospital affiliated primary care systems.  In addition to increasing accessibility of the services, embedding MAT in primary care will normalize the care, helping to overcome stigma.  

Language is powerful: 

Go to DrugFreeNH.org to learn more about non-stigmatizing language.

 

The following is current medical terminology:

Substance Use Disorder 
Is a clinically accurate term and replaces substance “abuse” and “dependence.”

Person with a Substance Use Disorder or Person Living with an Addiction
Use “person first” language.  We are all people first.

Person in Recovery
This is accurate and a non-stigmatizing term to refer to a person who is stopping or reducing substance use to a safe level, and reflects a positive change.

Medication Assisted Treatment
This refers to the use of specific FDA-approved medicine to treat substance use disorders combined with psychosocial support services. Medication is not a “replacement” or “substitution,” but a tool for recovery.

For more on addressing stigma, see: Partnership for a Drug Free NH